Category of Organisms Marine Molluscs
Kingdom Animalia
Phylum/Division Mollusca
Class Cephalopoda
Order Sepiida
Family Sepiidae
Genus Sepia
Species latimanus
Binomial Name
Sepia latimanus
Author Quoy and Gaimard, 1832
Common Name  
Local Name  
Size Range
Second largest cuttlefish species after Sepia apama, growing to 50 cm in mantle length and 10 kg in weight
Environment/Habitat
Living at a depth of up to 30 m
Importance/Value
It is an important and prized fisheries species harvested using trawls, squid lights and traps.
Resilience
 
Endemic No
Found in Marine Park No
Found in Malaysia Yes
Distribution
 
Morphology/Character
It is capable of many different colour patterns most of which include a pattern of small white and black spots scattered over he body. the eye is typically yellow around the edges. The common name comes from the wide clubs on the ends of the feeding  tentacles which have around 6 large suckers and numerous small suckers. This species is day active and is capable of excellent camouflage. Rhythmic bands of dark quickly pulsed along the body and arms. if viewed from the front these moving bands converge at the arm tips and may act to distract or even mesmerise the prey. its feeds on fish and crustaceans, often using a spectacular hunting technique

Biology
In breeding season, males often establish a territory defending a coral head suitable for egg-laying (typically corals in the genus Porites). displaying males are recognised by black and white colour pattern including narrow white stripes on the body edges, fins and third arms, as well as wide black bands on the first two arm pairs.
Females seek out coral heads, mate with the male and push their soft eggs deep within the fingers of coral. The eggs then harden making them very difficult to remove. Coral fish hang around females during egg laying sometimes extracting eggs that are not set deep enough within the coral. Eggs hatch within 4-6 weeks with the young immediately hiding amongst coral and rubble.

Miscellaneaous
 
Status in IUCN Red List Unknown
Status in CITES Species Database Unknown
Researcher(s)  
Reference(s)
CEPHALOPODS A WORLDS GUIDE by Mark Norman, published by Die Deutsche Bibliothek,2003 Page: 60-62
Other Link(s)
Collection Record