Category of Organisms Marine Mammals
Kingdom Animalia
Phylum/Division Chordata
Class Mammalia
Order Cetacea
Family Ziphiidae
Genus Mesoplodon
Species densirostris
Binomial Name
Mesoplodon densirostris
Author Blainville, 1817
Common Name Blainville's beaked whale
Local Name  
Size Range
Males reach at least 4.4 meters (14 ft 6 in) and 800 kg (1800 pounds), whereas females reach at least 4.6 meters (15') and 1 tonne (2200 pounds). Juveniles are 1.9 meters long (6 ft 4 in) when born and weigh 60 kg (130 lb).
Environment/Habitat
Like other beaked whales, these whales are found mostly offshore in deep waters, but they may sometimes occur reasonably close to shore (MacLeod and Zuur 2005). A detailed analysis of habitat preferences in the Bahamas, where this species is commonly encountered, indicated that Blainville’s beaked whales were found preferentially in waters of intermediate depth gradients and depths between 200 and 1,000 m (continental slope waters). These may be areas of increased prey availability caused by interactions of currents and local topography (MacLeod and Zuur 2005).
Importance/Value
 
Resilience
 
Endemic No
Found in Marine Park No
Found in Malaysia Yes
Distribution
 
Morphology/Character
The body of Blainville's Beaked Whale is robust, but also somewhat compressed laterally compared with other Mesoplodonts. The males have a highly distinctive appearance, the jaws overarch the rostrum, like a handful of other species, but does it towards the beginning of the mandible and then sloped down into a moderately long beak. Before the jaw sloped down, a forewords facing, barnacle infested tooth is present. One of the more remarkable features of the whale is the extremely dense bones in the rostrum (hence the name), which are most likely a form of protection again aggression from other males. The melon of the whale is flat and hardly noticeable. Coloration is dark blue/gray on top and lighter gray on the bottom, and the head is normally brownish. Males have scars and cookie cutter shark bites typical of the genus.

Biology
Squid are apparently the main food items, but some deepwater fish may be taken as well. Like most other ziphiids, they are thought to be suction feeders.

Miscellaneaous
 
Status in IUCN Red List Data Deficient (DD)
Status in CITES Species Database II
Researcher(s)  
Reference(s)
RALF KIEFNER, WHALES & DOLPHINS CETACEAN WORLD GUIDE, PUBLISHED BY IKAN, Page: 279
Other Link(s)
Collection Record